Tagged: Computers

SEND A MESSAGE

April 3rd in history:

The first run of the Pony Express between St. Joseph, Missouri and Sacramento, California began on April 3rd, 1860.

Laptop computers have become the favorite means of communication for many people. IBM’s first laptop was introduced on April 3rd, 1986.

Former college professor Ted Kaczynski sent messages to the media complaining about modern technology. His crusade against technology also included bombings which killed three people. Kaczynski, better known as the “Unabomber,” was arrested at a cabin in Montana on April 3rd, 1996.

The first portable “cell phone” call made in New York City happened on this date in 1973.

Actor Alec Baldwin was once removed from an airplane parked at the Los Angeles airport when he refused to stop playing a word game on his cell phone. Baldwin, born on this date in 1958, played fictional TV network boss Jack Donaghy on the sitcom “30 Rock.”

And telephone calls are a major element to the plot of “Pillow Talk,” the only movie for which Doris Day received an Oscar nomination for Best Actress. Day celebrates her 90th birthday today, although some sources say she was born on April 3rd, 1922, not 1924.

IT AIN’T OVER ‘TIL IT’S “OVER”

February 15th in history:

The red-and-white Maple Leaf flag first flew over Canada on February 15th, 1965.

That same year, the last piece of the Gateway Arch was put in place, 600 feet over the city of St. Louis, Missouri. The Arch has become the most visible symbol of St. Louis, established on February 15th, 1764.

Another arch was immortalized in a tune by songwriter Harold Arlen, born on this day in 1905. He wrote the music to “Over the Rainbow” and the other songs in “The Wizard of Oz.”

If you wanted to sing “Over the Rainbow” over the Internet, you might post a video on YouTube. February 15th, 2005 was the first full day of operation for the do-it-yourself video website, but there were no videos to watch until the following April, when founder Jawed Karim posted a clip of himself visiting the San Diego Zoo.

I NEVER FORGET A FACE

February 4th in history:

The Electoral College met for the first time to choose a U.S. president on February 4th, 1789. Electors unanimously chose the man whose face is on the dollar bill, George Washington.

You can probably find the faces of many friends on the Facebook website, which was founded on this date in 2004. Mark Zuckerberg started the social web page while still a student at Harvard, and it was originally meant to be used only by other Harvard students.

You may not know her face, but Janet Waldo has a familiar voice in the cartoon world. February 4th is her birthday. Waldo’s most famous characters include Judy Jetson and Penelope Pitstop, but she also played Alice in an animated version of “Alice in Wonderland.”

It’s also the birthday for a famous “Alice”: rock star Alice Cooper, born Vincent Furnier on February 4th, 1948.

FROM 49ers TO 1984

January 24th in history:

The California Gold Rush was triggered on January 24th, 1848, when James Marshall found gold at Sutter’s Mill.  Most of the U.S. didn’t hear about the discovery until late in ’48, when President James K. Polk mentioned the gold rush in his State of the Union message.  The treasure hunters who went to California in the months afterward became known as ’49ers.

Today’s 49ers, the NFL team from San Francisco, played in the Super Bowl for the first time on January 24, 1982, at the Pontiac Silverdome in Pontiac, Michigan. They won Super Bowl XVI by a 26-21 score over the Cincinnati Bengals.

The ring awarded to Super Bowl winners is made of gold and decorated with diamonds.  January 24th is the birthday of Olympic gold-medal winner Mary Lou Retton (born 1968) and singer-songwriter Neil Diamond (1941).

The Super Bowl didn’t become known for clever and expensive TV commercials until Apple Computers did a parody of the book “1984″ to introduce its new Macintosh personal computer.  The Super Bowl ad ran two days before the Mac officially went on sale January 24th, 1984.

CHET AND THE NET

October 29 in history:

The first version of the internet was called the ARPANET.  On October 29th, 1969, two computers were linked together to communicate with each other for the first time.  One was at UCLA, and the other was in Northern California.

One man in New York, one man in Washington.  It was a high-tech television partnership that lasted for 14 years on NBC’s “Huntley-Brinkley Report,” which began on this date in 1956.  Chet Huntley was at the New York anchor desk, with David Brinkley in D.C.

Huntley and Brinkley also anchored NBC coverage of many space flights in the ’60s.  John Glenn first flew in space in 1962.  By the time he went into orbit again, Glenn had been elected to the U.S. Senate from Ohio.  His second space mission, as part of the crew of the shuttle Discovery, began on October 29th, 1998.

Richard Dreyfuss went into space aboard an alien ship at the end of the 1977 film “Close Encounters of the Third Kind.”  He won an Oscar for another movie he made the same year, “The Goodbye Girl.”  Dreyfuss was born October 29th, 1947.