Category: Trivia

MESSAGE TO WASHINGTON

August 30 in history:

Lincoln and Booth were together every week in the ’60s…the 1960s. On your TV screen.  Raymond Massey…famous for playing Abraham Lincoln on stage and film…portrayed Dr. Gillespie on “Dr. Kildare.” NBC followed “Kildare” on Thursday nights with “Hazel,” starring Shirley Booth.  The two shows debuted on the same night in 1961, and remained together on the NBC schedule until “Hazel” moved to CBS in 1965.  Both stars were born on August 30th…Massey in 1896, and Booth in 1898.

For much of the run of “Dr. Kildare,” “Lincoln” (Massey) was competing with “Steven Douglas” for Thursday night viewers. Fred MacMurray, born Aug. 30th, 1908, starred as Steve Douglas on “My Three Sons,” which was often scheduled on ABC opposite NBC’s “Kildare.”

One hundred years after Lincoln was president, a famous telephone was installed at the White House on August 30th, 1963. It was the first hotline between Washington and the Kremlin, designed to help communications between East and West and avoid international incidents.  It wasn’t a direct phone line between the U.S. president and the Soviet leader.  The Pentagon acted as a go-between.

George Washington got a message, a peace offer, from a British general on this date in 1776.  General William Howe offered to let Washington and his army escape from Brooklyn Heights before a possible British attack.  Washington rejected the offer, and sent it to the Continental Congress.


KATRINA AND THE WAVES

August 29 in history:

Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast of the U.S. on August 29th, 2005, leading to massive flooding in New Orleans when many levees on the Mississippi were breached.  More than 18-hundred people died because of the storm, while over 20,000 people took shelter in the Louisiana Superdome.

A made-for-TV movie called “Superdome,” broadcast in 1978, starred David Janssen from the 1960s series “The Fugitive.”  The final episode of “The Fugitive” aired on August 29th, 1967.  Almost half the households in America watched as Dr. Richard Kimble confronted the real killer of his wife, the “one-armed man.”  The last line of the episode was “Tuesday, August 29th…the day the running stopped.”

August 29th of 2008 was the day the running started for vice-presidential candidate Sarah Palin, the governor of Alaska. Palin suddenly became a household name when Republican presidential candidate John McCain chose her as his running mate.  It was Palin’s 20th wedding anniversary and McCain’s 72nd birthday.  And on this date in 1968, Senator Edmund Muskie of Maine was nominated as Hubert Humphrey’s running mate at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago.

THEY HAD A DREAM

August 28 in history:

The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom drew about 200,000 people to Washington, D.C. on August 28th, 1963. The March is remembered as the occasion when Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his “I have a dream” speech to the crowd gathered in front of the Lincoln Memorial.

Forty-five years later, on August 28th, 2008, presidential candidate Barack Obama referred to King’s speech at the Lincoln Memorial during his own acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention.  The outdoor speech was given at Invesco Field (now Sports Authority Field) at Mile High, the home stadium of the Denver Broncos.

In 2013, Quvenzhane Wallis became the youngest African-American to receive an Oscar nomination for acting and the youngest person ever nominated for the Best Actress Oscar, for her role in “Beasts of the Southern Wild.”  Wallis turns 12 years old today.

Berry Gordy Jr. had a dream of running a record company.  Gordy’s company Motown released “Please Mr. Postman” by the Marvelettes on this day in 1961.  It would become Motown’s first number-one record.

Michael Jackson was one of the most successful artists on Motown Records.  In 1984, Jackson starred in TV commercials for a soft drink which got its current name on August 28th, 1898.  North Carolina druggist Caleb Bradham had invented a beverage he called “Brad’s Drink,” but in 1898, he renamed it “Pepsi-Cola.”


IT’S ALL IN THE GAME

August 27 in history:

Washington Senators LogoAugust 27th is the only date which is the birthday of more than one Vice-President of the United States. Three V-P’s actually were born on this date:  Lincoln’s first V-P, Hannibal Hamlin (1809), Coolidge’s V-P, Charles Dawes (1865), and Lyndon Johnson (1908), who later became President after Kennedy’s assassination.

Dawes is the only U.S. vice-president who wrote a number-one hit song.  His tune titled “Melody in A Major” was turned into “It’s All in the Game,” and the Tommy Edwards recording topped the charts in 1958. On this date in ’58, it looked like the game of major league baseball would be leaving Washington, D.C., when the owner of the Senators ball club said he would probably move the team to Minnesota. President Eisenhower even weighed in that day, urging the Senators to stay in D.C.

Another town got a professional sports team on August 27th, 1921, when the Green Bay Packers went pro and joined an organization which would soon be renamed the National Football League.

Greenbay_packers_1921

SEE JANE RUN. SEE JANE VOTE.

August 26 in history:

The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution took effect on August 26th, 1920, giving American women the right to vote.

It’s the birthday of the first woman to be nominated as Vice President by a major political party, Democrat Geraldine Ferraro, born in 1935.

Hillary Rodham Clinton spoke to the Democratic Party convention in Denver on this date in 2008, the night before she officially conceded the party’s presidential nomination to Barack Obama.

Women still cannot be elected pope or vote for the pope. On August 26th, 1978, Catholic Cardinal Albino Luciani was elected pope to succeed Paul the 6th. Luciani combined the names of the two most recent popes in naming himself John Paul the 1st.

August 26th is also the birthday of Mother Teresa (born 1910), the European-born nun who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1979 for her work with the poor people of Calcutta.

HOLY HOAXES, MAN-BAT!

August 25 in history:

Philbin Hall

Thirty-five years after being launched from Earth, the Voyager 1 space probe left the solar system on August 25th of 2012. It became the first man-made object to enter interstellar space

On August 25th of 1609, Galileo Galilei demonstrated his first telescope to lawmakers in Venice, hoping they would purchase it. His introduction of the telescope was once parodied on “The Carol Burnett Show.”  In the sketch, when a spectator looked through the telescope and complained that he couldn’t see anything, Galileo responded that you had to put a dime in first.

The New York Sun newspaper claimed in 1835 that a powerful new telescope revealed an unknown civilization on the moon.  In a series of stories beginning on August 25th, the Sun told of oceans, beaches, and trees seen on the lunar surface.  What became known as the “Great Moon Hoax” also included reports of beavers walking on two legs, and winged humans called “man-bats.”

Moviegoers went batty for “Batman” when director Tim Burton made two movies about the comic-book hero.  Burton, born August 25th, 1958, has a fanciful film resume that includes “Pee-Wee’s Big Adventure,” “Beetlejuice,” “The Nightmare Before Christmas,” and new versions of “Alice in Wonderland” and the TV drama “Dark Shadows.”

On the same day Tim Burton was born, the game show “Concentration” made its debut.  The show requiring players to match hidden prizes and solve a rebus ran for 15 years on NBC before going into syndication and returning to NBC as “Classic Concentration” in the 1980s.  Two men famous for hosting other popular game shows share an August 25th birthday:  Monty Hall of “Let’s Make a Deal” (born 1921), and Regis Philbin of “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire” (1931).


MY CITY WAS GONE

August 24 in history:

August 24 News Team

The White House and the U.S. Capitol were among the government buildings destroyed or damaged by fire by the British during a raid on Washington, D.C., late in the War of 1812.  The British forces attacked on August 24th, 1814.

Many historians believe August 24th of 79 A.D. was the day that the Italian city of Pompeii was destroyed by a fiery eruption of the volcano Mount Vesuvius.  The ruins of Pompeii were buried under several feet of ash for centuries.  In 1599, parts of the city were briefly unearthed by an architect named Domenico Fontana.

Actor Joe Regalbuto played reporter Frank Fontana on the sitcom “Murphy Brown.”  Regalbuto was born August 24th, 1949, the same day and year as actor Charles Rocket, who also played a fictional TV reporter as the “Weekend Update” anchor on “Saturday Night Live.”  Two other men famous for playing “fake” newsmen were born on this date in 1962:  original “Daily Show” anchor Craig Kilborn, and David Koechner, alias Champ Kind from the “Anchorman” movies.  It’s also the birthday of real-life TV reporter and former “Meet the Press” host David Gregory (born 1970).