Tagged: Academy Awards

EASY RIDERS?

February 19th in history:

Space travelers from Russia and other countries rode aboard the Mir Space Station during its 15 years in Earth orbit. The Mir successfully went into orbit on February 19th, 1986.

On this day in 1988, athletes were competing at the Winter Olympics in Calgary. One of the most memorable athletes at Calgary was British ski-jumper Eddie “The Eagle” Edwards. Heavier than his opponents and requiring glasses, Eddie won a cult following even though he rode his skis to last-place finishes in both his events.

Eddie Arcaro was born February 19th, 1916. Arcaro won almost 4,800 horse races in his career as a jockey, including two Triple Crowns.

Actor Lee Marvin also had success riding a horse. Marvin, born February 19th, 1924, won the Best Actor Oscar in 1965 for playing the drunken gunfighter Kid Shaleen in “Cat Ballou.”

Advertisements

DAY/LIGHT SAVINGS

February 9th in history:

Judith Light Saving Time

It took 100 years after the adoption of the U.S. Constitution for the agriculture secretary to become a member of the president’s cabinet. On February 9th, 1889, President Cleveland signed a bill to make the USDA an official Cabinet department.

By the time the Ag Department joined the Cabinet, Hawaii was already importing migrant workers from Japan to work on sugar plantations. The first legal Japanese immigrants arrived in Hawaii for the first time on this date in 1885. Illegal immigrants had traveled to the islands for about 20 years before that, but the government of Japan did not approve of their immigration until the 1880s.

In 1942, America was at war with the Land of the Rising Sun because of the invasion of Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. To help industry meet supply demands for wartime, the U.S. began year-round daylight saving time on February 9th, 1942, and kept it in effect until the end of the war.

If you don’t set your clock for the start of Daylight Saving Time, you may be too late for things.  Singer and songwriter Carole King won a Record of the Year Grammy in 1972 for her hit song “It’s Too Late” from the album “Tapestry.”  King was born in 1942 on the same day that DST started year-round, and she shares a birthday with fellow Brill Building songwriter Barry Mann (born 1939).

And February 9th is a “Day/Light” birthday for two TV stars…Charlie Day (born 1976), from “It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia,” and Judith Light (1949), from “Who’s the Boss?” and “Ugly Betty.”

 

OF ALL THE TOWNS IN ALL THE WORLD

January 14th in history:

network-peter-finch-faye-dunaway

The name “Casablanca” made headlines when U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill met in the Moroccan city for a war conference, beginning January 14th, 1943. The two Allied leaders spent nearly two weeks planning European strategy against Italy and Nazi Germany.

The Casablanca meeting coincided with the general release of the movie “Casablanca,” starring Humphrey Bogart. Bogie died of cancer on January 14th, 1957 — just five years after winning his only Oscar for “The African Queen.”

Twenty years later, actor Peter Finch died on January 14th, 1977. Finch would win a posthumous Oscar as Best Actor that year for his role as mad anchorman Howard Beale in “Network.” Finch died on the 36th birthday of his “Network” co-star Faye Dunaway (1941), who won the Best Actress Oscar for that movie. The two had no scenes together in “Network.”

COME BLOW YOUR HORN, START CELEBRATIN’

December 31 in history:

The days of traditional street lamps were numbered after December 31st, 1879, when Thomas Edison demonstrated incandescent street lamps in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

A crystal ball with electric lights was used to count down to the new year in Manhattan’s Times Square for the first time on December 31st, 1907.  Fireworks had been used for a few years before they got the idea of “dropping the ball” to mark the stroke of midnight.

England actually does “ring in” a new year by airing the midnight chimes of the bell “Big Ben” over BBC Radio.  That broadcasting tradition was born on New Year’s Eve of 1923.

Another famous “Ben” from England was born on December 31st, 1943: actor Ben Kingsley, whose birth name was Krishna Bhanji.  Kingsley won an Oscar for playing the title role in Gandhi, and he’s been featured in Schindler’s List and Bugsy.  

Sir Ben Kingsley shares a New Year’s Eve birthday with Sir Anthony Hopkins (born 1937), best known for winning the Oscar as Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs. Hopkins also has played real people from Hitler to Hitchcock, and Nixon to John Quincy Adams.  Hopkins and Kingsley were among five Oscar winners who jointly honored the Best Actor nominees at the Academy Awards in February of 2009.

The Best Actor winner from 1944, Bing Crosby, became the first singer to perform the song “Cabaret” on U.S. network television, on the New Year’s Eve 1966 broadcast of “The Hollywood Palace” on ABC.  The title song from the popular Kander and Ebb musical included special lyrics written for the occasion:

“We’ll pop the cork, and toast the year
At 12 o’clock, start celebratin’
Nineteen sixty-seven’s waitin.'”

A New Year’s themed episode of the “M*A*S*H” TV series from December of 1980 condenses an entire year of the Korean War for the 4077th into a single half-hour.  Two stars of the series died on New Year’s Eve in consecutive years.  Wayne Rogers (born 1933), who played “Trapper John” McIntyre, died December 31st, 2015…and one year later, William Christopher (born 1932), who portrayed Father Mulcahy, passed away on New Year’s Eve.

ADMISSION: IMPEACHABLE

December 19 in history:

Bill Clinton became the second U.S. president to be impeached, when the House approved impeachment charges against him on December 19th, 1998, halfway through his second term.  Clinton was impeached for perjury and obstruction of justice, for lying about his relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.  The scandal threatened to sink the Clinton presidency, but Clinton was acquitted by the Senate and finished his term.

A romantic epic about a famous ocean liner that sank in 1912 opened in movie theaters on this day in 1997.  The James Cameron film Titanic, starring Leonardo Di Caprio and Kate Winslet, tied the record 11 Oscars won in 1959 by Ben-Hur.  Titanic also set box office records which were broken a decade later by another Cameron movie, Avatar.

Unlike the Titanic, three ships that left England for America on December 19th, 1606, did reach their destination.  The ships brought more than 100 settlers to the Virginia colony, where they established the community of Jamestown.

The city of Jamestown, New York, has a museum dedicated to hometown celebrity Lucille Ball and her first husband, Desi Arnaz, who were married for 20 years.  Lucy’s second marriage, to comedian Gary Morton, lasted 28 years until her death.  Morton, who produced Lucy’s TV series after “I Love Lucy,” was born on this date in 1924.  It’s also the birthday of actress Elaine Joyce (1945), known for many television appearances and stage shows including the musical “Sugar.”  Like Morton, Joyce also is famous as the spouse of a comedy legend, playwright Neil Simon.

Before becoming a playwright, Neil Simon wrote for popular TV variety series including “Your Show of Shows” with Sid Caesar, and “The Garry Moore Show.” On this date in 1961, the Moore show featured Julie Andrews singing “My Favorite Things,” perhaps one of the earliest times that the song from “The Sound of Music” became associated with the Christmas season. Andrews did not appear in the original Broadway production of “Sound of Music,” and did not make the movie until three years after the Garry Moore Christmas show.

SUPER-PLUMMER-FRANCIS-DRAKE-AND-VAN-DYKE-JULIE-DOCIOUS

December 13 in history:

When Francis Drake sailed from Plymouth, England, on December 13th, 1577, it was the beginning of a three-year trip around the world.  One of the main purposes of Drake’s voyage was to explore the Pacific coast of the Americas, and to raid Spanish settlements along the ocean.

A crew led by Dutch explorer Abel Tasman became the first Europeans to see New Zealand on this date in 1642.  Tasman briefly stopped on the South Island, but when some of his crewmen were killed in a confrontation with the Maori natives, the ship quickly moved on.

A Navy pilot is stranded on an island in “Lt. Robin Crusoe, U.S.N,” one of a series of Disney movies in the 1960s that starred Dick Van Dyke, born December 13th, 1925.  Besides having TV success on “The Dick Van Dyke Show” in the ’60s and “Diagnosis: Murder” in the ’90s, Van Dyke also had several hit movies including “Bye Bye Birdie,” “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang,” and Disney’s “Mary Poppins” with Julie Andrews.

Taylor_Swift_-_1989A year after “Mary Poppins,” Andrews starred in “The Sound of Music” with another actor born on December 13th, Christopher Plummer (1929). Plummer’s other movies include “The Insider,” “Up,” and “Beginners,” for which he won an Oscar at age 82.

Julie Andrews has done three TV specials with Carol Burnett. They aired in the U.S. in 1962, 1971…and on December 13th, 1989, the day that singer Taylor Swift was born. Swift acted in young people’s theater productions (once playing Maria in “Sound of Music”) before launching a country music career as a teenager. Swift has won more than 200 awards for her country and pop recordings, including seven Grammys before the age of 25.

THE SKY, THE MOON AND THE STARS

July 26 in history:

 

The first launch of a space shuttle since the Columbia disaster of 2003 happened on July 26th, 2005. It was the first time that the shuttle Discovery had flown in almost four years.

The fourth manned landing on the moon occurred during the Apollo 15 mission, which launched on this date in 1971. Astronauts James Irwin and David Scott were the first ones to use a “moon rover” vehicle during this mission.

The Oscar-winning song “Moon River” comes from the movie Breakfast at Tiffany’s, directed by Blake Edwards, born on July 26th, 1922. Also born on the same date that year was Jason Robards, one of four Academy Award winning actors or actresses who share this birthday. The others are Helen Mirren (1945), Kevin Spacey (1959), and Sandra Bullock (1964).

Director Stanley Kubrick also was born on July 26th (1928).  Kubrick got four Oscar nominations for best director during his career, for films including “Dr. Strangelove,” “A Clockwork Orange,” and “Barry Lyndon.”  But his only personal Oscar win was for special visual effects in the 1968 epic “2001: A Space Odyssey.”

Before she became successful in movies, Sandra Bullock starred in a TV sitcom based on the film comedy “Working Girl.”  Three famous sitcom wives of the 1950’s had July 26th birthdays: Gracie Allen (born 1895), Vivian Vance (1909), alias Ethel Mertz of “I Love Lucy,” and Marjorie Lord (1918), Kathy Williams on “The Danny Thomas Show.”