Tagged: board games

GAME OF LIFE / MYSTERY DEATH

November 8 in history:

Two Roosevelts were elected president on November 8th — 28 years apart. The first was Teddy Roosevelt in 1904, winning a full term after filling out the unexpired term of William McKinley. And Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated Herbert Hoover in 1932 for the first of his four presidential wins.

In other famous elections on November 8th…John F. Kennedy narrowly beat Richard Nixon for the White House in 1960, Ronald Reagan was elected governor of California in 1966, and Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential race over Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Trump may be the only U.S. president who inspired a board game before becoming Chief Executive. “Trump: The Game,” a real estate contest, was introduced by the Milton Bradley Company in 1989. Inventor Milton Bradley was born on this day in 1836. The company is known for “The Game of Life,” “Candyland,” and “Chutes and Ladders,” as well as for home versions of popular TV game shows.

The panel show “What’s My Line?” inspired a couple of U.S. home versions, neither one made by Milton Bradley. Columnist Dorothy Kilgallen was a regular panelist on “Line” for 15 years, until her sudden death on November 8th, 1965, a few hours after appearing live on the Sunday night program. Conspiracy theorists have suggested someone murdered Kilgallen for knowing too much about the JFK assassination, or UFOs, or something else. By coincidence, Kilgallen’s death was announced on CBS just after her pre-taped appearance on the November 8th daytime episode of “To Tell the Truth.” On that same day, the NBC soap opera “Days of Our Lives” made its debut, beginning a run that continues today.

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SOUSA, SAX, AND THE LUXURY TAX

November 6 in history:

Abraham Lincoln was elected president of the United States on November 6th, 1860.  Over the next 12 months, several Southern states would secede and form the Confederacy.  Their first presidential election was exactly one year after Lincoln’s election, on this date in 1861.  Former U.S. Secretary of War Jefferson Davis had already been appointed Confederate president before winning the election.

The Civil War ended and the Confederacy folded before Davis got to finish his six-year term.  After a few years under the Stars and Bars, the Southern states returned to the Stars and Stripes, forever.  Saaaay, that might make a good song title!  Composer John Philip Sousa thought so.  “The Stars and Stripes Forever” is one of the most popular marches written by the “March King,” born on November 6th, 1854.

Sousa commissioned the development of the sousaphone, and another musician who has an instrument named after him shares Sousa’s birthday.  Belgian Adolphe Sax, born on this date in 1814, patented the saxophone when he was 31.

Atlantic-City MonopolyBoth the sousaphone and saxophone are popular marching-band instruments played at football games.  The very first official college football game in the U.S. was played in New Jersey on November 6th, 1869, at Rutgers University.  In that first contest, each score was worth only one point, and they played until 10 total points had been scored.  Rutgers beat Princeton, 6 to 4.

The streets of one New Jersey city inspired the names of spaces on a classic board game for which Parker Brothers obtained patents on this date in 1935.  Pass “Go” and collect $200 if you knew that the landmarks on a “Monopoly” board are actual places in Atlantic City.