Tagged: Bob Hope

FATEFUL FLIGHT

October 23 in history:

Brutus is infamous for his role in assassinating Julius Caesar in the Roman Senate, in 44 B.C.  Two years later, on October 23rd, 42 B.C., Brutus met his own fate, killing himself after losing the second battle of Philippi to Marc Antony.

A fateful meeting of two old friends, two pilots, led to deadly consequences in 1942.  One man was flying a B-34 bomber for the Army, while the other was a pilot for American Airlines.  They discovered that both would be flying near Palm Springs, California the next day, October 23rd.  On that day, the bomber pilot, Lt. William Wilson, tried flying close to American Flight 28 to signal to his friend, First Officer Louis Reppert.  Wilson got too close, and the planes collided.  The airliner crashed in the desert, killing all 12 people aboard.  Wilson went through a court-martial, but was acquitted.

One passenger on the American flight was an Oscar-winning songwriter, Ralph Rainger.  He’s best known for writing the theme songs used by two popular comedians…”Love in Bloom,” associated with Jack Benny, and “Thanks for the Memory,” Bob Hope’s theme.  Late in their careers, Hope and Benny appeared frequently with Johnny Carson on “The Tonight Show.”  Carson became a comedy legend in his own right, by hosting “Tonight” for 30 years.  He was born October 23rd, 1925.

NBC airs “Saturday Night Live” in the “Tonight Show” time slot on weekends.  On October 23rd, 1976, Steve Martin hosted “SNL” for the first time, and played the host of “Jeopardy! 1999,” a futuristic parody of the popular game show. “I Lost on Jeopardy,” a take-off of the Greg Kihn song “Jeopardy,” was an early hit for song parodist and musician “Weird Al” Yankovic, born this day in 1959.

THE ROAD TO EVEREST

May 29th in history:


A National World War II Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C. on May 29th, 2004, nearly 60 years after the end of the war.  The monument was built on the National Mall, between the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial.

Two famous Americans who have had U.S. Navy ships named after them were born on May 29th: President John F. Kennedy (1917), and comedian Bob Hope (1903).  It was during World War II when Kennedy commanded the boat PT-109 in the Pacific, and Hope began a long tradition of taking USO shows to American troops overseas.

Shortly after JFK’s assassination, his widow Jacqueline compared the Kennedy White House to King Arthur’s Camelot.  The musical “Camelot” was based on the “Once and Future King” series of books about Arthur by English author T.H. White, born on May 29th, 1906.

Bob Hope’s partner in the popular “Road” pictures, Bing Crosby, starred in a movie version of “A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court.” On this day in 1942, Crosby recorded his biggest hit, introduced in the movie “Holiday Inn.” His version of Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas” was recorded in just 18 minutes.

Edmund Hillary and his guide Tenzing Norgay reached the white, snow-covered summit of Mount Everest on May 29th, 1953. While there is speculation that other climbers reached the summit years before, Hillary claimed credit as the first one to come back from the summit alive.

THE GIPPER AND THE OSCAR

March 30th in history:

On March 30th, 1981, President Ronald Reagan and three other men, including his press secretary, James Brady, were shot and wounded outside the Washington Hilton by gunman John Hinckley.   Reagan became the first U.S. president to survive being shot while in office.  The Academy Awards, scheduled for that night, were postponed for one day because of the shooting.

Reagan never received an Oscar nomination during his movie career, but his first wife, Jane Wyman, was nominated four times and won the award once.  Wyman’s last nomination for Best Actress was for “Magnificent Obsession.”  She lost that award to Grace Kelly (for “The Country Girl”) during the Academy Awards presented on March 30th, 1955.  “On the Waterfront” won the Best Picture Oscar, along with acting honors for Marlon Brando and Eva Marie Saint.

When John Hinckley shot President Reagan, he claimed he did it to impress actress Jodie Foster.  On March 30th of 1992, Foster won her second Oscar, for playing FBI agent Clarice Starling in “The Silence of the Lambs.”  The movie also won awards for Best Picture, and for Anthony Hopkins as Dr. Hannibal Lecter.

Warren Beatty was nominated against Hopkins that night for the film “Bugsy.”  Beatty, born on this date in 1937, has been Oscar-nominated for acting, writing, and directing.  He took home the statue for directing “Reds” in 1981.