Tagged: Broadway

YOU GOT TROUBLE IN THE POTOMAC RIVER CITY

February 17th in history:

Thomas Jefferson was elected president by the U.S. House on this date in 1801. The House had to break an electoral tie between Jefferson and Aaron Burr. As a result, Burr became vice president.

A helicopter buzzed the White House on February 17th, 1974, during the final months of Richard Nixon’s presidency. The chopper was stolen and flown by a disgruntled Army private named Robert Preston.

Actor Robert Preston was starring in the original Broadway production of “The Music Man” in February of 1958. For those who couldn’t go to Broadway, television was growing in popularity as an entertainment medium. On February 17th, 1958, Pope Pius XII declared St. Clare of Assisi the patron saint of television.

If there were no such thing as TV, there would be no “Larry the Cable Guy.” Larry, known in real life as Dan Whitney, celebrates his birthday on this day (1963).

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DEATH OF A SALESMAN / BIRTH OF A SNOWMAN

February 10th in history:

The play “Death of a Salesman” made its Broadway debut on February 10th, 1949, starring Lee J. Cobb as salesman Willy Loman.  It has been revived frequently in New York, with later productions starring George C. Scott, Dustin Hoffman, and Philip Seymour Hoffman.  “Salesman” won a Pulitzer prize for playwright Arthur Miller, who died on this date in 2005, on the 56th anniversary of the play’s premiere.

Willy Loman dies in a car crash at the end of “Salesman.”  Auto safety was the topic on this day in 1966 when attorney and consumer advocate Ralph Nader made his first appearance ever before a Congressional committee.  Nader had just published the book “Unsafe at Any Speed,” criticizing a lack of safety features in American-made cars.

A car crash in the desert sets off a wild chase in the 1963 comedy “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.”  Jimmy Durante plays the dying driver who tells rescuers about a buried treasure in stolen money.  It was the last feature film appearance for Durante, born February 10th, 1893.  Durante is also known to modern audiences for singing during the opening credits of “Sleepless in Seattle” and as the narrator of the animated Christmas special “Frosty the Snowman.”

MEN AT THE TOP

January 20th in history:

John Marshall won a powerful job in the U.S. government on this date in 1801. Marshall was appointed Chief Justice. He led the Supreme Court for 34 years, serving under six presidents.

In 1937, January 20th became Inauguration Day in the U.S., the traditional day for the Chief Justice to swear in the newly-elected president. Before that year, presidents had to wait until March 4th to begin their terms.

England had a new king on January 20th, 1936, when King George the 5th died after a 25-year reign. His oldest son immediately became King Edward the 8th, but he abdicated before the year was done because of the furor over his intent to marry a divorced American woman.

And the artist nicknamed the “Line King,” Al Hirschfeld, died on January 20th, 2003. Hirschfeld was famous for his caricatures of Broadway and Hollywood celebrities. He died five months short of his 100th birthday. Long live the King!

LAST CALL FOR ALCOHOL

January 16th in history:

Prohibition became the law in the U.S. when 36 states ratified the 18th Amendment. That threshold was reached on January 16th, 1919, when five states approved the amendment in one day. The actual ban on alcohol took effect one year later.

The beer-brewing Busch family has its name on the home stadium of the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team.  Two famous players for the Cardinals were born on January 16th…Jay “Dizzy” Dean (1910) and Albert Pujols (1980).

“I get no kick from champagne” is the opening line of the song “I Get a Kick Out of You,” introduced by Ethel Merman in the Cole Porter musical “Anything Goes.”  Merman was born January 16th, 1908.  She originated the roles of Annie Oakley in “Annie Get Your Gun” and Mama Rose in “Gypsy,” and played Mrs. Marcus in the movie “It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World.”

Ethel Merman turned down the chance to star as Dolly Levi in the original Broadway production of “Hello, Dolly!”  The musical version of the play “The Matchmaker,” starring Carol Channing as Dolly, opened in New York on January 16th, 1964.  When that production closed in 1970, Merman was playing Dolly.

A more recent Broadway star was born on this date in 1980.  Lin-Manuel Miranda is famous for creating the hit musical “Hamilton,” and for originating the title role.  Miranda is also featured in the 2018 movie musical “Mary Poppins Returns.”

VIETNAM AND HOLLAND

November 13 in history:

A “March Against Death” to protest the Vietnam War began at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia on November 13th, 1969.  More than 40,000 protesters marched into Washington, as a prelude to a large anti-war moratorium two days later.

On the same date 13 years later, in 1982, a monument to the thousands of Americans killed in Vietnam was dedicated near the Lincoln Memorial.  The V-shaped granite wall bearing names of the war dead was not universally popular at first, but since its dedication, it has been praised for the simplicity of its design.

The Holland Tunnel linking New Jersey to Manhattan was an early example of an automotive tunnel designed to keep car exhaust from building up.  The nearly two-mile tunnel, named after its chief engineer, Clifford Holland, opened on November 13th, 1927.

November 13th was opening night in 1997 for the Broadway musical version of the Disney movie “The Lion King.”  Actress Whoopi Goldberg, born Caryn Johnson on this date in 1955, provided the voice of the hyena Shenzi in the original animated movie.

Since 2007, Whoopi Goldberg has been one of the hosts of the ABC daytime talk show “The View.”  Jimmy Kimmel, born on November 13th, 1967, has been a late-night talk show host on ABC even longer, since 2003.  Before that, Kimmel was a co-host of “The Man Show” and “Win Ben Stein’s Money.”

YOU’VE GOT TO BE CAREFULLY TAUGHT

July 12th in history:

Malala Yousafzai

On this day in 1862, members of Congress authorized the Medal of Honor to be given by the U.S. Army for acts of valor.  More than 3,500 Medals of Honor have been awarded, with nearly half going to people who served in the Civil War.  As of 2018, Civil War physician Mary Edwards Walker is the only woman to receive the medal.

Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro made history on this day in 1984, when Walter Mondale announced that she would be his running mate in the presidential election. Ferraro was a former school teacher who became a lawyer and eventually a representative from New York. She became the first woman nominated for vice-president by a major party.

Political activist Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan has traveled the world, advocating education for young girls. Malala, born on this day in 1997, survived being shot in the head during an assassination attempt to stop her campaign to let girls attend school. She received the Nobel Peace Prize in 2014, making her, at age 17, the youngest-ever Nobel Prize laureate.

The sons and daughters of the King of Siam are taught by governess Anna Leonowens in the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “The King and I.” Oscar Hammerstein II, born on July 12th, 1895, wrote the book and lyrics to “King and I” and other famous musicals, including “Show Boat,” “The Sound of Music,” and “South Pacific.”

TAKE A WALK

June 3rd in history:

A former king of England walked down the aisle with the former Mrs. Wallis Simpson on June 3rd, 1937. Upon their marriage, they were known as the Duke and Duchess of Windsor. The wedding took place on the birthday of the Duke’s late father, King George V (1865).

Ed White became the first American astronaut to walk in space on June 3rd, 1965, during the mission of Gemini 4.

Mighty Casey didn’t get a walk, or a run, in the famous poem “Casey at the Bat” by Ernest Thayer. The poem was first published on June 3rd, 1888, in the San Francisco Examiner.

And a dance number featuring a chorus line of “old ladies” using walkers is a highlight of the stage musical “The Producers,” based on the 1968 Mel Brooks movie. On this date in 2001, the original Broadway version of “The Producers” won a record-setting 12 Tony Awards.