Tagged: CBS

GAME OF LIFE / MYSTERY DEATH

November 8 in history:

Two Roosevelts were elected president on November 8th — 28 years apart. The first was Teddy Roosevelt in 1904, winning a full term after filling out the unexpired term of William McKinley. And Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated Herbert Hoover in 1932 for the first of his four presidential wins.

In other famous elections on November 8th…John F. Kennedy narrowly beat Richard Nixon for the White House in 1960, Ronald Reagan was elected governor of California in 1966, and Donald Trump won the 2016 presidential race over Hillary Rodham Clinton.

Trump may be the only U.S. president who inspired a board game before becoming Chief Executive. “Trump: The Game,” a real estate contest, was introduced by the Milton Bradley Company in 1989. Inventor Milton Bradley was born on this day in 1836. The company is known for “The Game of Life,” “Candyland,” and “Chutes and Ladders,” as well as for home versions of popular TV game shows.

The panel show “What’s My Line?” inspired a couple of U.S. home versions, neither one made by Milton Bradley. Columnist Dorothy Kilgallen was a regular panelist on “Line” for 15 years, until her sudden death on November 8th, 1965, a few hours after appearing live on the Sunday night program. Conspiracy theorists have suggested someone murdered Kilgallen for knowing too much about the JFK assassination, or UFOs, or something else. By coincidence, Kilgallen’s death was announced on CBS just after her pre-taped appearance on the November 8th daytime episode of “To Tell the Truth.” On that same day, the NBC soap opera “Days of Our Lives” made its debut, beginning a run that continues today.

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IRAN, IRAN SO FAR AWAY

November 4 in history:

U.S. Presidents elected on November 4th include Barack Obama in 2008, Dwight Eisenhower in 1952, and Ronald Reagan in 1980.

The ’80 election may have been decided partly because of two things that happened November 4th, 1979.  On that day, radicals in Iran took over the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and kept 52 people hostage for the next 444 days.  The hostage incident was a protest of America’s decision to allow the former Shah of Iran into the U.S. for medical treatment, a move which some believed was part of an American plot to return him to power.

The other event was a TV interview with Senator Ted Kennedy aired on November 4th of ’79 on CBS, shortly before Kennedy announced he would challenge President Carter for the Democratic nomination.  Roger Mudd of CBS asked Kennedy why he wanted to be president.  Media pundits repeatedly criticized Kennedy after he was unable to give a straight answer to the question.

Roger Mudd was a frequent substitute anchor on the “CBS Evening News” for long-time anchor Walter Cronkite, who was born on this date in 1916.  Like Cronkite, another person known for announcing election results on TV was born on November 4th…Jeff Probst (1962), famous for saying “The tribe has spoken” in declaring who was voted off the island on the reality show “Survivor.”

ANIMAL STORIES

October 3 in history:

The popular “Siegfried and Roy” magic act at the Mirage in Las Vegas was disrupted on October 3rd, 2003, when one of the duo’s famous tigers bit Roy Horn in the neck.  The attack effectively brought an end to the long-running act, although Siegfried and Roy did comeback performances a few years later.  The tiger attack happened on Roy’s 59th birthday.

A mouse and a “kangaroo” both began long-running children’s shows on TV on October 3rd, 1955.  The mouse was Mickey Mouse, cartoon star of the original “Mickey Mouse Club” on ABC, featuring the Mouseketeers, talented kids wearing sweaters and mouse ears.  Same day, different network: “Captain Kangaroo” made his debut on CBS. Bob Keeshan played the Captain as a grandfatherly host with a big mustache and deep-pocketed jackets.  He had a number of “animal” co-stars, including Dancing Bear and the puppets Bunny Rabbit and Mr. Moose.

“Buffalo wings” were invented on this day in 1964. That is, a special recipe for chicken wings coated with cayenne pepper sauce, created at the Anchor Bar in Buffalo, N.Y.

The Buffalo Bills football team featured Heisman winner O.J. Simpson on their roster for nine seasons. Millions tuned in to live TV on this day in 1995 to see Simpson acquitted in the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman. On the same date 13 years later, Simpson was found guilty in a kidnapping and armed robbery case in Nevada. He served nine years in prison in that case, and was released in 2017, just days before the October 3rd anniversary of both verdicts.

BRITISH INVASIONS

September 28 in history:

The Norman Conquest began on this date in 1066, when William, the Duke of Normandy, invaded England.  William was crowned king of England the following Christmas.

The battle which ended the American Revolution began on September 28th, 1781.  The British surrendered three weeks into the Battle of Yorktown in Virginia.

“Revolution” was the flip side of the Beatles’ single “Hey Jude,” which became the number-one song in America on this day in 1968, replacing “Harper Valley P.T.A.”  “Hey Jude” stayed on top of the charts for two months.

The Beatles led the “British Invasion” of American popular music when they first appeared on “The Ed Sullivan Show” in 1964. Sullivan was born September 28th, 1901…the same day and year as his long-time boss at CBS, network founder William S. Paley.

A NEW CAR!!

September 4 in history:

On September 4th, 1957, Ford Motor Company president Henry Ford the 2nd celebrated his 40th birthday by unveiling a new car brand named after his late father, Edsel Ford.  Edsels in showrooms around America were kept under wraps until the 4th, “E-Day.” More than 60,000 Edsels were built the first year, but two years later, production was down to about three thousand, and the brand was discontinued.

An Edsel may have been given away as a prize on “The Price Is Right” during its original run on TV in the 1950s and ’60s.  On September 4th, 1972, the game show was revived on CBS as “The New Price Is Right,” hosted by Bob Barker.  A contestant won a Chevrolet Vega wagon worth $2,746 in the first “pricing game” of the new show.

A new way of taking photographs was introduced by inventor George Eastman:  a personal camera that used rolls of film instead of photographic plates.  On this date in 1888, Eastman registered the trademark name “Kodak” for the camera company he would start four years later.

Another leap in technology occurred on September 4th, 1998, when Stanford graduate students Sergey Brin and Larry Page incorporated a company named Google, which would become famous for its internet search engine.

ENTER AND SIGN IN, PLEASE

September 3 in history:

England’s King Richard the 1st, the Lionheart, was crowned on September 3rd, 1189.  Ironically, Richard primarily spoke French, and spent little time in England during his 10 years on the throne.

The United States formally separated from England with the signing of the Treaty of Paris on this date in 1783, officially ending the American Revolution.  John Adams and Benjamin Franklin were among the signers for the U.S.

“Signing in” on a blackboard was the way contestants made their entrance on the long-running game show “What’s My Line?”  The original Sunday night version of “Line” ended its 17-year run on CBS on September 3rd, 1967.  A daily syndicated version was launched a year later.

Actress and singer Kitty Carlisle Hart occasionally appeared as a panelist on “What’s My Line?”, but was more famous as a regular panel member on “To Tell the Truth.”  She was born on this date in 1910.


MASSACHUSETTS LINKS

June 20th in history:

On June 20th, 1840, Massachusetts native Samuel F.B. Morse received a patent for his telegraph.

Another form of fast communication was the Hot Line between the U.S. and the Soviet Union, installed June 20th, 1963, during the presidency of John F. Kennedy (from Massachusetts).

In New Bedford, Massachusetts, on June 20th, 1893, Lizzie Borden was acquitted of the ax murders of her mother and father.

And June 20th is the birthday of Oscar winner Olympia Dukakis (1931), a Massachusetts native and cousin of former Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis. Olympia Dukakis won her Oscar for the 1987 movie comedy “Moonstruck,” and shares a June 20th birthday with two other stars of that film:  Danny Aiello (born 1933) and John Mahoney (1940).

“Moonstruck” also features the Dean Martin song “That’s Amore,” introduced in the Martin and Lewis movie “The Caddy.”  Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis were among the guests on the premiere of the CBS variety show “Toast of the Town” on June 20th, 1948.  The series eventually was renamed “The Ed Sullivan Show,” and ran for 23 years.