Tagged: Chicago Cubs

LIGHTS ON IN CHICAGO, LIGHTS OUT IN WASHINGTON

August 8 in history:

August 8th of 1988 (8/8/88) marked the end of an era at Wrigley Field in Chicago:  the era of daytime-only baseball games at the park.  The Cubs played a night game on their home field for the first time, against the Philadelphia Phillies.  They couldn’t finish the game, because it was rained out in the 4th inning.

The Nixon era at the White House ended on August 8th, 1974, when Richard Nixon became the first president to resign before the end of his term.  Nixon made the announcement on nationwide TV that night, less than two years after carrying 49 states in the 1972 election. Nixon’s resignation speech came exactly six years after the night in 1968 when he accepted the Republican Party nomination for president for the second time.

The Watergate scandal leading to Nixon’s resignation was the subject of the film “All the President’s Men.”  Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman starred in the movie as Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein.  Hoffman, also known for “The Graduate,” “Tootsie,” and “Rain Man”, was born August 8th, 1937.

One of Dustin Hoffman’s most famous movie lines is “I’m walking here!,” shouted by the character Ratso Rizzo while crossing a street in the 1969 film “Midnight Cowboy.”  On August 8th of 1969, the Beatles took their famous walk across Abbey Road in London, immortalized on the cover of the “Abbey Road” album.  Photographer Iain Macmillan took six photos of the band walking — three where they face right, and three facing left.


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CAN’T WE ALL JUST GET ALONG?

January 31st in history:

Two Wisconsin towns called Kilbourntown and Juneautown merged on January 31st, 1846, after years of disputes. They were on opposite sides of a river, and Kilbourntown on the west side often attempted to isolate Juneautown to the east. When the two towns finally became a single city, they named the new community after the river between them: the Milwaukee River.

Former Milwaukee Brewers owner Bud Selig was the baseball commissioner who suspended outspoken player John Rocker on this date in 2000. Rocker, a star relief pitcher for the Atlanta Braves, had angered many fans with an interview in Sports Illustrated where he made racist and anti-gay remarks, and said unflattering things about New York City. January 31st also is the birthday of Ernie Banks (born 1931), the first black player for the Chicago Cubs.

And the 3M Company turned a slur against a nationality into a successful brand name when it started selling Scotch Tape on January 31st, 1930. The name “Scotch” came from a customer complaint that 3M put too little adhesive on the tape, in order to save money.