Tagged: Chicago

HERE’S JOHNNY!

May 22nd in history:

Carson SilhouetteOnly two volcanic eruptions occurred in the U.S. during the 20th century. One was the Mount St. Helens eruption of 1980. The other happened on May 22nd, 1915, with an explosion at Lassen Peak in northern California.

Another powerful act of nature, an earthquake, struck southern Chile on this date in 1960, killing thousands of people.  Known as the Valdivia quake, it was the strongest earthquake ever recorded, measuring 9.5 on the Richter Scale.  Severe tornadoes also have occurred on May 22nd, in Hallam, Nebraska (in 2004) and Joplin, Missouri (2011).  The Joplin twister caused more than 150 deaths, and was the deadliest tornado in the U.S. in more than 60 years.

Wreckage from an airplane explosion fell from the sky onto Missouri and Iowa on May 22nd, 1962, when a Continental Airlines flight between Chicago and Kansas City blew up.  All 45 people aboard were killed.  One of the passengers, who had earlier taken out a large insurance policy, apparently planted a bomb in a restroom.  The tragedy reportedly inspired part of the plot of the 1970 movie “Airport.”

In May of 1962, Iowa native Johnny Carson was preparing to take over NBC’s “Tonight Show.” He had just been hired to replace the departing Jack Paar. Carson stayed on as host of “Tonight” longer than any other person, almost 30 years, ending his run on May 22nd, 1992.

Another TV personality named “Johnny” made his debut on this day in 1910:  that was the birthdate of announcer Johnny Olson, who’s most famous for shouting “Come on down!” to contestants on “The Price Is Right.”  Olson also served as the announcer on “What’s My Line?,” “Match Game,” and “The Jackie Gleason Show.”

THE RIOT ACT

May 4th in history:

Four students died and nine others were wounded at Kent State University in Ohio on May 4th, 1970, after the Ohio National Guard began shooting to break up a demonstration against fighting in Vietnam and Cambodia.

On this date in 1886, a bomb exploded during a labor rally in Chicago. A policeman was killed by the explosion, and other officers fired into the crowd, leading to what became known as the Haymarket Square riot.

And a two-day riot at Alcatraz Prison in California ended on May 4th, 1946. Five people were killed in the uprising.

WOULD YOU LOOK AT THAT?

May 3rd in history:

May 3rd, 1494, was the day Christopher Columbus sighted Jamaica for the first time.

The tallest building you can see in Chicago is the Willis Tower, formerly known as the Sears Tower. When the tower reached its maximum height on May 3rd, 1973, it was the world’s tallest building.

Visitors to Profile Lake in New Hampshire used to be able to look up into the hills and see “The Old Man of the Mountain,” a rock formation that resembled an old man’s profile – until May 3rd, 2003. That was the day most of the rocks forming the face tumbled down the mountain.

From the mountain to the “Valli”…singer Frankie Valli of the Four Seasons, known for hits like “Can’t Take My Eyes Off You” and “My Eyes Adored You,” was born on May 3rd, 1934.

HE’S THE FIRST

April 13th in history:

Firsts for African-Americans on April 13th …

Sidney Poitier became the first black man to win an Oscar for acting on April 13th, 1964. Poitier was named Best Actor for “Lilies of the Field.”

On April 13th, 1983, Harold Washington was elected the first black mayor of Chicago.

And Tiger Woods became the first black champion of the Masters golf tournament (and the youngest winner, at age 21) on this date in 1997.

 

NO CIGARETTES? HAVE SOME GUM

April 1st in history:

A historic day for the Air Force in two countries: The Royal Canadian Air Force was founded on April 1st, 1924. Exactly 30 years later, in 1954, President Dwight Eisenhower authorized the establishment of the U.S. Air Force Academy in Colorado.

Clearing the “air” of smoke: Eisenhower’s vice-president, Richard Nixon, was president himself in 1970. On April 1st of that year, Nixon signed the Public Health Cigarette Smoking Act, which would take all radio and TV commercials for cigarettes off the air in early ’71.

A popular substitute for smoking – chewing gum – has made a fortune for the William Wrigley Company, founded in Chicago on April 1st, 1891. Wrigley’s didn’t start selling gum until a year after the company was in business. Free samples of gum given away with packages of baking powder became more popular than the powder.

Rachel TaranFictional 19th century critic Jebidiah Atkinson from “Saturday Night Live” could have been an early customer of Wrigley’s gum (but he might not admit to liking it). Atkinson is a popular SNL character performed by Taran Killam, born on April 1st, 1982. Killam played another 19th century character in “12 Years a Slave,” and in the Broadway musical “Hamilton” (as King George III).

SNL is produced at New York’s Rockefeller Center, which also houses the MSNBC cable news network. MSNBC host Rachel Maddow was born on this day in 1973.

NBC aired the sitcom “The Debbie Reynolds Show” in 1969-70. Reynolds, born April 1st, 1932, was better known for movies, including “Singin’ in the Rain” and “The Unsinkable Molly Brown.” Reynolds’s personal life also kept her in the public eye. Her first marriage, to Eddie Fisher, ended when Fisher left her to marry Elizabeth Taylor. Debbie and Eddie’s daughter, Carrie Fisher, played Princess Leia in the “Star Wars” movies. Carrie died unexpectedly in December 2016, and Debbie died the next day.

THAT’S NO ISTANBUL

March 28th in history:

On March 28th, 1854, Britain and France declared war on Russia, bringing those countries into the Crimean War. The largest numbers of troops fighting the war came from Russia, France, Britain, and Turkey.

On this day in 1930, the city of Constantinople was given the more Turkish name Istanbul. The change inspired a popular song, “Istanbul (Not Constantinople),” which was a hit for the Four Lads in 1953 and later covered by They Might Be Giants.

The 1964 heist movie Topkapi is set in Istanbul.  British actor Peter Ustinov won his second Supporting Actor Oscar for Topkapi (his first Oscar was for Spartacus).  Ustinov, also known as an author and playwright, was 82 when he died on this date in 2004.

Ustinov was born Peter Alexander von Ustinov (or Ustinow). The singer born Stephani Germanotta, now known as Lady Gaga, was born this day in 1986, and is known for hits such as “Poker Face” and “Born This Way.”  And popular radio DJ John Records Landecker really was born that way, with the middle name “Records,” on March 28th, 1947.  Landecker is best known for working at Chicago station WLS in the ’70s and ’80s.

SPIRITS AND HIGH FLYING

February 20th in history:

Congress was ready to end Prohibition in 1933. On February 20th of that year, members of Congress proposed the 21st Amendment, to repeal the 18th Amendment that banned liquor in the U.S. and led to the rise of gangsters such as Al Capone.

Chicago lawyer Edward Joseph O’Hare helped send Capone to prison. O’Hare’s son, Edward “Butch” O’Hare, became the first American flying ace of World War II on February 20th, 1942, by shooting down Japanese bombers over the Pacific. Chicago’s O’Hare Airport is named after Butch.

Twenty years later, on February 20th, 1962, John Glenn became a different type of flying ace. That was the day Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth in the Mercury capsule Friendship 7.

February 20th is also the birthday of some performers who have played high-flying characters:

Actress Sandy Duncan (born 1946) has played Peter Pan frequently on stage;

Comedian Joel Hodgson (1960) was stuck on a spaceship, watching bad movies with two wise-cracking robots, on the TV series “Mystery Science Theater 3000”;

And French Stewart (1964) was part of a “family” of space aliens posing as humans on the sitcom “3rd Rock from the Sun.”