Tagged: Herbert Hoover

A NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM

August 10 in history:

On August 10th, 1792, King Louis the 16th of France was sent to prison, and a royal art collection at the Louvre Palace in Paris was confiscated by the government.  The Louvre reopened as a museum exactly one year later.

On this date in 1846, the U.S. government established the Smithsonian Institution as a museum and research organization.  The original half-million dollar sum used to establish the Institution came from the estate of British scientist James Smithson.

Herbert Hoover became the fourth U.S. president to have his own official museum and library, when the Hoover Library was dedicated on August 10th, 1962 at West Branch, Iowa.  That was Hoover’s 88th birthday.

PRESIDENTS ON TV AND IN THE MOVIES

April 7th in history:

The first publicly-seen television broadcast between two U.S. cities happened on April 7th, 1927. The link between New York and Washington featured President Calvin Coolidge’s Secretary of Commerce, who would be president himself just two years later: Herbert Hoover.

President Richard Nixon announced on April 7th, 1969, that he would increase the U.S. troop withdrawals from Vietnam.

That announcement came on the 30th birthday of two famous men whose careers would be tied to Vietnam and Nixon. Director Francis Ford Coppola set the novel “Heart of Darkness” in Vietnam for his war epic “Apocalypse Now.” And TV personality David Frost conducted a famous series of 1977 interviews with former President Nixon, which were dramatized in the play and movie “Frost/Nixon.”

Also born on April 7th: Daniel Ellsberg (1931), famous for releasing the Pentagon Papers revealing government decisions about the Vietnam War, and another movie director, Alan Pakula (1928), who made “All the President’s Men,” about the Washington Post reporters who uncovered many details about the Watergate scandal in the Nixon White House.

SAME DING-BAT TIME, SAME DING-BAT CHANNEL

January 12th in history:

Archie and Edith Dynamic Duo

Just a month after Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Roosevelt took action on January 12th of 1942 to prevent major industries from shutting down.  Roosevelt created the National War Labor Board, to stop strikes by workers at businesses supplying vital materials for the war.

It wasn’t Roosevelt that Archie and Edith Bunker wanted to see again, but Herbert Hoover. Carroll O’Connor and Jean Stapleton, as the Bunkers, praised Hoover in the song “Those Were the Days” to open the first episode of “All in the Family” on CBS, January 12th, 1971.

January 12th was the premiere date for “Batman” on ABC in 1966.  For most of its three years on the air, “Batman” was seen twice a week, with a story beginning on the Wednesday episode and building to a cliff-hanger ending to be resolved on Thursday, “same Bat-time, same Bat-channel.”  Many stories began with Bruce Wayne/Batman (Adam West) receiving his assignment over the “Batphone” from Police Commissioner Gordon of Gotham City.

For 23 years, Kenesaw Mountain Landis was the commissioner of bats, balls, diamonds, and all things related to baseball in the US.  Landis, a federal judge, was elected the first commissioner of baseball on January 12th, 1921.

And happy birthday to Mr. Freese…not a “Batman” villain, but saxophone player Jason Freese, born on this date in 1975.  Freese has performed with Green Day and other popular rock bands..

GAME OF LIFE / MYSTERY DEATH

November 8 in history:

Two Roosevelts were elected president on November 8th — 28 years apart.  The first was Teddy Roosevelt in 1904, winning a full term after filling out the unexpired term of William McKinley.  And Franklin D. Roosevelt defeated Herbert Hoover in 1932 for the first of his four presidential wins.

This was also the date in 1960 when John F. Kennedy narrowly beat Richard Nixon for the White House.

Columnist Dorothy Kilgallen wrote many newspaper stories questioning the official government report on the Kennedy assassination.  Kilgallen died suddenly on November 8th, 1965, a few hours after her regular weekly appearance on the game show “What’s My Line?” Conspiracy theorists have suggested someone murdered Kilgallen for knowing too much about the assassination, or UFOs, or something else.  By coincidence, Kilgallen’s death was announced on CBS just after her pre-taped appearance on an episode of “To Tell the Truth.”

Many popular TV game shows were turned into home games by the Milton Bradley Company of Massachusetts, including “Concentration,” “Password,” and “Jeopardy!”  Inventor Milton Bradley’s first successful game was “The Checkered Game of Life.”  Bradley was born on November 8th, 1836.