Tagged: Johnny Carson

HERE’S JOHNNY!

May 22nd in history:

Carson SilhouetteOnly two volcanic eruptions occurred in the U.S. during the 20th century. One was the Mount St. Helens eruption of 1980. The other happened on May 22nd, 1915, with an explosion at Lassen Peak in northern California.

Another powerful act of nature, an earthquake, struck southern Chile on this date in 1960, killing thousands of people.  Known as the Valdivia quake, it was the strongest earthquake ever recorded, measuring 9.5 on the Richter Scale.  Severe tornadoes also have occurred on May 22nd, in Hallam, Nebraska (in 2004) and Joplin, Missouri (2011).  The Joplin twister caused more than 150 deaths, and was the deadliest tornado in the U.S. in more than 60 years.

Wreckage from an airplane explosion fell from the sky onto Missouri and Iowa on May 22nd, 1962, when a Continental Airlines flight between Chicago and Kansas City blew up.  All 45 people aboard were killed.  One of the passengers, who had earlier taken out a large insurance policy, apparently planted a bomb in a restroom.  The tragedy reportedly inspired part of the plot of the 1970 movie “Airport.”

In May of 1962, Iowa native Johnny Carson was preparing to take over NBC’s “Tonight Show.” He had just been hired to replace the departing Jack Paar. Carson stayed on as host of “Tonight” longer than any other person, almost 30 years, ending his run on May 22nd, 1992.

Another TV personality named “Johnny” made his debut on this day in 1910:  that was the birthdate of announcer Johnny Olson, who’s most famous for shouting “Come on down!” to contestants on “The Price Is Right.”  Olson also served as the announcer on “What’s My Line?,” “Match Game,” and “The Jackie Gleason Show.”

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IT’S A BIRD, IT’S A PLANE, IT’S TINY TIM!

December 17 in history:

The Wright Brothers earned their wings on December 17th, 1903, by successfully flying an airplane at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina.  That was the day Orville Wright made the first powered flight of a plane, going 120 feet in 12 seconds.  Later in the day, brother Wilbur kept the plane in the air for about a minute.

Other flying objects were the focus of Project Blue Book.  But the U.S. Air Force officially closed the book on UFO investigations on December 17th, 1969.  In nearly two decades, the government collected nearly 13,000 reports of unidentified flying objects.  Most of the reports were explained easily, but of the objects that remained “unidentified,” the Air Force said it found no proof that any of them was an alien spacecraft.

On the same day that Project Blue Book was declared to be over, there was an unusual nighttime sighting all across America, on TV screens.  More than 20 million Americans watched long-haired, falsetto-voiced singer Tiny Tim become a married man on “The Tonight Show.”  Host Johnny Carson had invited Tim (real name, Herbert Khaury) to wed his teenage fiancee Victoria Budinger, alias “Miss Vicki,” on the December 17th broadcast in ’69.

“If TV has taught me anything, it’s that miracles always happen to poor kids at Christmas.”  That wasn’t said by Tiny Tim from “A Christmas Carol,” but by another fictional child: Bart Simpson.  It’s a quote from the very first half-hour episode of “The Simpsons,” aired on December 17th, 1989:  a holiday story called “Simpsons Roasting on an Open Fire.”  Bart, Homer, Marge, Lisa, and Maggie originated as characters in short films by cartoonist Matt Groening featured on “The Tracey Ullman Show.”  “The Simpsons” is now the longest-running American sitcom and the longest-running American animated program.