Tagged: Martha Washington

WHO’S THAT LADY?

June 2nd in history:

Church Lady QEII

The first “First Lady” of the U.S., Martha Washington, was born on June 2nd, 1731 – making her a few months older than George.

Frances Folsom became First Lady on June 2nd, 1886 – the day she married President Grover Cleveland at the White House. Cleveland was not the only president to marry while in office, but he was the only one to have the ceremony at the Executive Mansion.

Britain’s “first lady” since the 1950s, Queen Elizabeth II, celebrated her coronation on this day in 1953.  It was the first coronation of a British monarch to be televised.

She was not a “First Lady,” and some might not even call Bridget Bishop a “lady” at all. Somebody claimed she was a witch – and on this date in 1692, she became the first defendant in the Salem witch trials in Massachusetts. Bishop was convicted, and hanged eight days after the start of her trial.

And it’s the birthday of “Saturday Night Live’s” “Church Lady”…but that was no lady, that was comedian Dana Carvey (born 1955).  Carvey also is well-known for his impersonation of President George Herbert Walker Bush, and as Wayne’s buddy Garth in the “Wayne’s World” sketches and movies.

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LADIES FIRST

January 5th in history:

George and Martha Washington never lived in the White House, but they were married at the “White House” in January of 1759.  This White House was Martha’s plantation in Virginia.  Sources disagree on what day the Washington wedding took place.  Some say it was January 5th.  Others say it was on the 6th, or the 17th.  Martha became the first “First Lady” of the United States 30 years later.

Jane Wyman also married a future U.S. President, Ronald Reagan, but wasn’t married to him long enough to be a First Lady. When Reagan was president, Wyman was starring on TV in “Falcon Crest.”  Her movie career included a Best Actress Oscar for the movie Johnny Belinda.  Wyman was born January 5th, 1917.

First Ladies

Another Oscar winner born on this day is Diane Keaton (1946), the first of many ladies to earn an Academy Award for acting in a Woody Allen film (Annie Hall).  Keaton’s credits include Reds and the Godfather movies.  She also starred in a TV movie as Amelia Earhart, the first lady to fly solo across the Atlantic.  Earhart was declared dead on this date in 1939, more than a year after she disappeared while trying to fly around the world.

And Nellie Tayloe Ross became America’s first “lady governor” when she was sworn in as governor of Wyoming on January 5th, 1925.  Nellie had won a special election to succeed her husband, William Ross, who had died after an appendectomy.

LAST ONE LEAVING THE MOON, TURN OFF THE LIGHTS

December 14 in history:

The last of the Apollo astronauts to walk on the moon blasted off from the lunar surface on December 14th, 1972.  Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt completed three walks outside the lunar lander during the 75 hours they spent on the moon as part of the Apollo 17 mission.

The Saturn rockets that launched men to the moon were developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center near Huntsville, Alabama.  On this date in 1819, Alabama became the 22nd state to join the Union.

The Alabama state quarter issued by the U.S. Mint in 2003 features a portrait of author Helen Keller on the tail side.  Actress Patty Duke, born Anna Marie Duke on December 14th, 1946, won an Oscar at age 16 for recreating her stage role as blind and deaf Helen in the movie, “The Miracle Worker.”  She later starred as “identical cousins” on “The Patty Duke Show.” Prior to her death in 2016, Duke wrote and spoke widely about her experience with bipolar disorder.

Patty Duke played Martha Washington in the 1984 TV miniseries “George Washington.”  On December 14th, 1799, George Washington died at his Virginia estate, Mount Vernon.  Medical experts know that Washington had soreness and swelling in the throat, but some believe the doctors’ practice of bleeding hastened his death.

Another famous George who died on this date was Notre Dame football star George Gipp.  He was 25 when he died on December 14th, 1920, apparently from a throat infection.  Future U.S. president Ronald Reagan played Gipp in the 1940 movie “Knute Rockne, All American,” in which the character urged Coach Rockne to “win one for the Gipper.”