Tagged: Maryland

IN THE NAVY / TURNING JAPANESE

October 10 in history:

On October 10th, 1973, Spiro Agnew became the second U.S. Vice President to resign.  He pled “no contest” to a charge of failing to report money he had been paid as a bribe while serving as governor of Maryland.  Agnew’s resignation led to the first use of the 25th Amendment to fill a vacancy in the office of vice president.

The U.S. Naval Academy opened in Maryland on this date in 1845, at Annapolis.  Commodore Matthew Perry helped establish the academy, years before he traveled to Japan to open formal relations between the U.S. and the Japanese.

Author James Clavell was famous for writing books set in Japan, including “Shogun” and “King Rat.”  Clavell was born on October 10th, 1924.

And October 10th was the opening day of the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.

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SIXTEEN CANDLES, BIRTHDAYS AND PARTIES

February 18th in history:

Actress Molly Ringwald was born February 18th, 1968. On that same day, a Chicago-area high school student named John Hughes had 18 candles on his birthday cake. Hughes became a popular movie director and featured Ringwald in three hit films, including “Sixteen Candles” and “The Breakfast Club.” Most of Hughes’ movies are set in and around Chicago.

The Chicago 7 were acquitted on this day in 1970. The seven anti-war protesters had been tried for conspiring to incite riots during the 1968 Democratic Convention in Chicago.

On February 18th, 1856, the Know-Nothing Party nominated its first and only presidential candidate, former president Millard Fillmore. He carried only the state of Maryland in the November election.