Tagged: Oscar

OF ALL THE TOWNS IN ALL THE WORLD

January 14th in history:

network-peter-finch-faye-dunaway

The name “Casablanca” made headlines when U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt and British Prime Minister Winston Churchill met in the Moroccan city for a war conference, beginning January 14th, 1943. The two Allied leaders spent nearly two weeks planning European strategy against Italy and Nazi Germany.

The Casablanca meeting coincided with the general release of the movie “Casablanca,” starring Humphrey Bogart. Bogie died of cancer on January 14th, 1957 — just five years after winning his only Oscar for “The African Queen.”

Twenty years later, actor Peter Finch died on January 14th, 1977. Finch would win a posthumous Oscar as Best Actor that year for his role as mad anchorman Howard Beale in “Network.” Finch died on the 36th birthday of his “Network” co-star Faye Dunaway (1941), who won the Best Actress Oscar for that movie. The two had no scenes together in “Network.”

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LOOK, UP IN THE SKY

January 7th in history:

Buck Rogers Flash Gordon

Comic strips about two space adventurers began on January 7th, five years apart…”Buck Rogers” in 1929, and “Flash Gordon” in 1934. This is also the birthday of Erin Gray (born 1950), who played Col. Wilma Deering in the “Buck Rogers” TV series of the 1970s.

The original “Star Trek” series featured many scripts by writer Gene L. Coon, born on this day in 1924. Coon also was a producer on “Star Trek,” and is credited with creating the Klingons and the concept of the Prime Directive.

On this date in 1610, Galileo wrote a letter citing his discovery of new objects near Jupiter. Those objects turned out to be Jupiter’s four largest moons.

And January 7th is the birthday of two stars of the movie “Moonstruck”:  Nicolas Cage (born 1964), and Vincent Gardenia (1922). Cage got a Golden Globe nomination for “Moonstruck,” while Gardenia was nominated for an Oscar. Cage won an Oscar for “Leaving Las Vegas,” and starred in “Honeymoon in Vegas.”

COME BLOW YOUR HORN, START CELEBRATIN’

December 31 in history:

The days of traditional street lamps were numbered after December 31st, 1879, when Thomas Edison demonstrated incandescent street lamps in Menlo Park, New Jersey.

A crystal ball with electric lights was used to count down to the new year in Manhattan’s Times Square for the first time on December 31st, 1907.  Fireworks had been used for a few years before they got the idea of “dropping the ball” to mark the stroke of midnight.

England actually does “ring in” a new year by airing the midnight chimes of the bell “Big Ben” over BBC Radio.  That broadcasting tradition was born on New Year’s Eve of 1923.

Another famous “Ben” from England was born on December 31st, 1943: actor Ben Kingsley, whose birth name was Krishna Bhanji.  Kingsley won an Oscar for playing the title role in Gandhi, and he’s been featured in Schindler’s List and Bugsy.  

Sir Ben Kingsley shares a New Year’s Eve birthday with Sir Anthony Hopkins (born 1937), best known for winning the Oscar as Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs. Hopkins also has played real people from Hitler to Hitchcock, and Nixon to John Quincy Adams.  Hopkins and Kingsley were among five Oscar winners who jointly honored the Best Actor nominees at the Academy Awards in February of 2009.

The Best Actor winner from 1944, Bing Crosby, became the first singer to perform the song “Cabaret” on U.S. network television, on the New Year’s Eve 1966 broadcast of “The Hollywood Palace” on ABC.  The title song from the popular Kander and Ebb musical included special lyrics written for the occasion:

“We’ll pop the cork, and toast the year
At 12 o’clock, start celebratin’
Nineteen sixty-seven’s waitin.'”

A New Year’s themed episode of the “M*A*S*H” TV series from December of 1980 condenses an entire year of the Korean War for the 4077th into a single half-hour.  Two stars of the series died on New Year’s Eve in consecutive years.  Wayne Rogers (born 1933), who played “Trapper John” McIntyre, died December 31st, 2015…and one year later, William Christopher (born 1932), who portrayed Father Mulcahy, passed away on New Year’s Eve.

LAST ONE LEAVING THE MOON, TURN OFF THE LIGHTS

December 14 in history:

The last of the Apollo astronauts to walk on the moon blasted off from the lunar surface on December 14th, 1972.  Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt completed three walks outside the lunar lander during the 75 hours they spent on the moon as part of the Apollo 17 mission.

The Saturn rockets that launched men to the moon were developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center near Huntsville, Alabama.  On this date in 1819, Alabama became the 22nd state to join the Union.

The Alabama state quarter issued by the U.S. Mint in 2003 features a portrait of author Helen Keller on the tail side.  Actress Patty Duke, born Anna Marie Duke on December 14th, 1946, won an Oscar at age 16 for recreating her stage role as blind and deaf Helen in the movie, “The Miracle Worker.”  She later starred as “identical cousins” on “The Patty Duke Show.” Prior to her death in 2016, Duke wrote and spoke widely about her experience with bipolar disorder.

Patty Duke played Martha Washington in the 1984 TV miniseries “George Washington.”  On December 14th, 1799, George Washington died at his Virginia estate, Mount Vernon.  Medical experts know that Washington had soreness and swelling in the throat, but some believe the doctors’ practice of bleeding hastened his death.

Another famous George who died on this date was Notre Dame football star George Gipp.  He was 25 when he died on December 14th, 1920, apparently from a throat infection.  Future U.S. president Ronald Reagan played Gipp in the 1940 movie “Knute Rockne, All American,” in which the character urged Coach Rockne to “win one for the Gipper.”

KING’S SPEECH

December 11 in history:

It was not the title speech given in the movie The King’s Speech, but King Edward VIII’s abdication speech was an important moment in the film, and in British history.  On December 11th, 1936, Edward took to the radio to explain to his subjects why he was stepping down after less than a year on the throne:  to marry the woman he loved, a divorced American named Wallis Simpson.  Many government leaders, including the prime minister, strongly opposed the king’s plans to wed Mrs. Simpson.

King gave a speech in Oslo, Norway on December 11th, 1964:  Martin Luther King, Jr., that is.  Dr. King presented a lecture on “The Quest for Peace and Justice” one day after formally accepting the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize.

And now, the award for outstanding Supporting Actress born on December 11th.  The nominees are:

Betsy Blair (born 1923), for Marty,

Rita Moreno (1931), for West Side Story,

Teri Garr (birth year uncertain), for Tootsie,

Mo’Nique (1967), for Precious, and…

Hailee Steinfeld (1996), for True Grit.

And the Oscar for Supporting Actress went to…(drumroll)…Moreno in 1962 and Mo’Nique in 2010.

MOVIE FAMILIES

November 28 in history:

A newspaper story called it “the worst disaster in Boston’s history.”  On November 28th, 1942, a fast-moving fire swept through the Cocoanut Grove nightclub of Boston, killing nearly 500 of the estimated 1000 people in the building.  Flammable decorations apparently ignited when a busboy lit a match to find a light socket.  Jammed and locked exits were blamed for some of the loss of life.

One of the most powerful men in the history of Hollywood started his career modestly in Massachusetts on this day in 1907, when Louis B. Mayer opened his first movie theater in Haverhill.  Mayer started making movies before long, and in less than 20 years, became the head of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.  Both of his daughters married movie producers, with David O. Selznick becoming a son-in-law of Mayer.

A Hollywood family named Newman has written movie music for decades.  Famous family members include Alfred Newman, Lionel Newman…and Randy Newman, born November 28th, 1943.  Randy has won Oscars for songs from the animated movies “Toy Story 3” and “Monsters, Inc.,” and has written the popular hits “Mama Told Me Not to Come” and “Short People.”

November 28th is also the birthday of two-time Oscar host Jon Stewart (1962), best known as the former host/anchor of “The Daily Show.”

TIME TO TRAVEL

November 18 in history:

The U.S. was divided into time zones on November 18th, 1883 by the railroad industry.  The move was needed so that trains could have standard arrival and departure times, instead of relying on local times based on the position of the sun.

The railroad tune “On the Atchison, Topeka, and the Santa Fe” from the movie The Harvey Girls was the first song to win an Oscar for lyricist Johnny Mercer, born on this date in 1909.  Mercer also won Academy Awards for two songs written with Henry Mancini, “Days of Wine and Roses” and “Moon River.”

A steamboat trip on a river is the setting for the first official Mickey Mouse cartoon, “Steamboat Willie,” released on November 18th, 1928.  It’s also considered the first successful movie cartoon with sound.