Tagged: Paul McCartney

I CAN SEE FOR MILES

October 9 in history:

The Washington Monument opened to the public on October 9th, 1888, 40 years after construction began.  The project was halted for many years because of a lack of funding and the intervention of the Civil War. The observation deck 500 feet above the ground was the highest man-made tourist spot in the world…for only seven months, until the Eiffel Tower opened in Paris.

The Eiffel Tower was built for a world’s fair celebrating the centennial of the French Revolution.  The guillotine became a symbol of the Revolution, and was the official method of execution in France for almost 200 years. On this date in 1981, France ended beheadings by guillotine as it abolished the national death penalty.

lennon-entwistle“You’d better keep your head, little girl” is a line from “Run For Your Life,” a song by John Lennon about a man warning his girlfriend not to cheat on him.  John’s more uplifting tunes include many love songs written with Paul McCartney, and solo songs such as “Imagine.” Lennon was born October 9th, 1940.  It’s also the birthday of another man named John who performed with a famous British rock band of the Sixties, John Entwistle of The Who (1944).

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JOHN, PAUL, GEORGE, AND RINGLING

July 6th in history:

One of the worst circus fires in U.S. history occurred on July 6th, 1944, in Hartford, Connecticut. More than 160 people died and hundreds more were injured when the Ringling Brothers big top caught fire and collapsed within minutes. Two young people who survived the Hartford fire and later became famous were actor Charles Nelson Reilly and drummer Hal Blaine.

Among the many famous performers Blaine worked with on records was John Lennon. On this date in 1957, 16-year-old Lennon and his band the Quarrymen were about to perform at a church social in Liverpool, England when he was introduced to 15-year-old Paul McCartney. Only seven years later, Lennon and McCartney became movie stars when the first Beatles movie, “A Hard Day’s Night,” premiered in England on July 6th, 1964.

On the day that “A Hard Day’s Night” made its debut, future president George Walker Bush turned 18. His father, George Herbert Walker Bush, was running for a U.S. Senate seat in Texas that year. The older Bush lost that election, but he rose through Republican ranks to become vice president under Ronald Reagan, and then president himself. First Lady Nancy Reagan, born July 6th, 1921, was Ronald Reagan’s second wife, and he was the first divorced man to be elected president.

When England’s Henry VIII wanted to end his first marriage to wed Anne Boleyn, one of his chief opponents was Lord Chancellor Thomas More. For opposing the king, More eventually was convicted of treason, and was beheaded on July 6th, 1535.

PIONEERING WOMEN

June 18th in history:

She was arrested for voting in a presidential election. A century later, she received an honor usually reserved for presidents: getting her face on a U.S. coin. Susan B. Anthony was fined $100 for illegally voting. The fine was imposed on June 18th, 1873.

On this date in 1928, Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly in an aircraft across the Atlantic. Earhart wasn’t the pilot, but was a passenger.

Exactly 55 years later, on June 18th, 1983, Sally Ride became the first American woman in space, aboard the shuttle Challenger.

And it’s the birthday of a man known for singing about women named “Sally G,” “Michelle,” “Eleanor Rigby,” and “Lady Madonna.”  Sir Paul McCartney was born on June 18th, 1942.

IN THE BEGINNING … AND IN THE END

April 10th in history:

In the worst submarine accident in U.S. history, the USS Thresher broke apart on April 10th, 1963, during diving tests in the Atlantic, 200 miles from Cape Cod.  One hundred twenty-nine people died aboard the sub.  Faulty welding was blamed for a leak which shut down the nuclear reactor aboard the Thresher.  The sub also was unable to surface.

The ill-fated voyage of the R.M.S. Titanic began on April 10th, 1912. The ocean liner sank five days into the trip.  Titanic was launched was at Southampton, England, even though it was registered to the port of Liverpool.

Actor Gene Hackman has starred in a submarine drama (“Crimson Tide”) and a disaster film about an ocean liner (“The Poseidon Adventure”).  Hackman was a nominee at two Oscar ceremonies held on April 10th.  In 1968, Hackman had his first nomination for “Bonnie and Clyde.”  He scored his first Oscar win on this date in 1972 for “The French Connection.”  

And the Liverpool band that recorded “Yellow Submarine” officially broke up on April 10th, 1970.  That was the day Paul McCartney released his first solo album, and announced that he was leaving the Beatles.  McCartney replaced Stu Sutcliffe as the bass player for the Beatles when Sutcliffe quit the band in 1961.  Sutcliffe was 21 when he died of a brain hemorrhage on this day in 1962.