Tagged: Spiro Agnew

SUPERHEROES AND UNDERDOGS

December 6 in history:

For the first time in U.S. history, the House of Representatives chose a vice president in mid-term under the 25th Amendment on December 6th, 1973. Michigan Congressman Gerald Ford was confirmed and sworn in the same day, nearly two months after former VP Spiro Agnew resigned. Before the 25th Amendment was ratified, if a sitting vice president died or resigned, the job remained vacant until the next election.

Jerry Ford was a college football star long before joining Congress in 1949. Jerry Rice of the 49ers set a pro football record on this date in 1992, catching the 101st touchdown of his NFL career. Rice needed only eight seasons to break the old record. A future football star was born on the day Rice set his record…2012 Heisman Trophy winner Johnny Manziel.

Rapper Chuck D mentioned Jerry Rice in the lyrics of his 1996 recording “Underdog.” Wally Cox, who spoke in rhyme as the animated super-hero Underdog, was born on December 6th, 1924. Cox also played schoolteacher “Mr. Peepers,” and was a regular panelist on “Hollywood Squares.” This is also the birthday of animator Nick Park (born 1958), creator of the stop-action Wallace and Gromit films. And on this day in 1964, the stop-action production of “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer” aired for the first time, as an NBC special sponsored by General Electric.

And underdogs are featured frequently in the work of Judd Apatow, born December 6th, 1967.  Apatow has produced, directed, and/or written “The 40-Year-Old Virgin,” “Knocked Up,” “Trainwreck,” “Bridesmaids,” “Anchorman,” and the TV series “Freaks and Geeks.”

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IN THE NAVY / TURNING JAPANESE

October 10 in history:

On October 10th, 1973, Spiro Agnew became the second U.S. Vice President to resign.  He pled “no contest” to a charge of failing to report money he had been paid as a bribe while serving as governor of Maryland.  Agnew’s resignation led to the first use of the 25th Amendment to fill a vacancy in the office of vice president.

The U.S. Naval Academy opened in Maryland on this date in 1845, at Annapolis.  Commodore Matthew Perry helped establish the academy, years before he traveled to Japan to open formal relations between the U.S. and the Japanese.

Author James Clavell was famous for writing books set in Japan, including “Shogun” and “King Rat.”  Clavell was born on October 10th, 1924.

And October 10th was the opening day of the 1964 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.