Tagged: Weekend Update

LONG BEFORE C-SPAN

February 8th in history:

Strong Koppel

The U.S. has had three vice-presidents named Johnson. The first one was Richard Johnson, who served under President Martin Van Buren. Johnson was chosen for VP by the Senate on February 8th, 1837, when no candidate could get a majority in the Electoral College.

Lyndon Johnson was vice-president in the summer of 1963, when Ted Koppel began his journalism career as the youngest reporter ever hired by ABC Radio. Koppel was only 23 — born on February 8th, 1940.

Koppel was anchoring the late-night news show “Nightline” in 1984, the year actress Cecily Strong was born on this date.  At the time of her birth, Strong’s father was head of the Associated Press Capitol bureau in Springfield, Illinois.  Cecily co-anchored “Weekend Update” on “Saturday Night Live” for one season, and emceed the 2015 White House Correspondents Dinner.  She’s well-known for her SNL impersonation of First Lady Melania Trump, and her character “The Girl You Wish You Hadn’t Started a Conversation With at a Party.”

Actor Jack Lemmon played Chicago newspaper reporter Hildy Johnson in the 1974 movie remake of the play “The Front Page.” Lemmon was born on this day in 1925. He won Oscars for “Mister Roberts” and “Save the Tiger,” and is also known for his roles in “Some Like It Hot,” “Days of Wine and Roses,” and several movies with “Front Page” co-star Walter Matthau.

A session of the U.S. Senate was broadcast for the first time on the radio, on February 8th, 1978, during debate on a Panama Canal treaty.  And radio made its way into the White House for the first time on this day in 1922, when President Warren Harding brought the new invention into the mansion.

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DO YOU SEE WHAT I SEE?

December 28 in history:

LEE

Galileo is thought to be the first person to have seen the planet Neptune, observing it through his telescope on December 28th, 1612.  But he is not considered the discoverer of Neptune, because he reportedly thought it was a star, instead of a planet.

An audience in Paris saw movies on December 28th, 1895, and became the first people to pay admission to watch films.  The Lumiere brothers sold tickets to a screening of scenes from everyday life in France.  We don’t know if they sold popcorn for the occasion.

Another type of image seen on a screen was publicized on that same day in 1895.  That’s when German physicist Wilhelm Roentgen published a paper “On a New Kind of Rays,” where he described the discovery of a form of light which could pass through skin but not bones.  The new ray became known as an X-ray.

The X-ray is radiation, but it’s not considered radioactive.  So if a spider zapped by an X-ray bit you, chances are you would not develop spider powers…as far as we know.  The comic book writer who created Spider-Man and other Marvel comics, Stan Lee, was born on December 28th, 1922.

A special 2009 edition of the Spider-Man comic book, called “The Short Halloween,” was written by “Saturday Night Live” veterans Seth Meyers and Bill Hader. Meyers, born on this day in 1973, was best known for anchoring “Weekend Update” on SNL before succeeding Jimmy Fallon as the host of “Late Night” on NBC in 2014.

MY CITY WAS GONE

August 24 in history:

August 24 News Team

The White House and the U.S. Capitol were among the government buildings destroyed or damaged by fire by the British during a raid on Washington, D.C., late in the War of 1812.  The British forces attacked on August 24th, 1814.

Many historians believe August 24th of 79 A.D. was the day that the Italian city of Pompeii was destroyed by a fiery eruption of the volcano Mount Vesuvius.  The ruins of Pompeii were buried under several feet of ash for centuries.  In 1599, parts of the city were briefly unearthed by an architect named Domenico Fontana.

Actor Joe Regalbuto played reporter Frank Fontana on the sitcom “Murphy Brown.”  Regalbuto was born August 24th, 1949, the same day and year as actor Charles Rocket, who also played a fictional TV reporter as the “Weekend Update” anchor on “Saturday Night Live.”  Two other men famous for playing “fake” newsmen were born on this date in 1962:  original “Daily Show” anchor Craig Kilborn, and David Koechner, alias Champ Kind from the “Anchorman” movies.  It’s also the birthday of real-life TV reporter and former “Meet the Press” host David Gregory (born 1970).