Tagged: West Point

LIONS AND TURKEYS AND BEARS, OH MY!

November 29 in history:

The Army and the Navy met each other on the football field for the first time on November 29th, 1890, at West Point. The Army Cadets had the home field advantage, but they were shut out by the Navy 24-0.  Now, the contest is usually played at a neutral site, Philadelphia.

The tradition of playing pro football on Thanksgiving began on this date in 1934, when the holiday was still celebrated on the last Thursday of November, instead of the fourth Thursday.  The Lions had just moved to Detroit, and as a publicity stunt, the club’s new owner arranged to have the team play a Thanksgiving Day ball game.  Detroit has hosted an NFL game on Thanksgiving ever since.

The Lions lost that first Thanksgiving game to the Chicago Bears.  Rahm Emanuel, the former White House Chief of Staff elected mayor of Chicago in 2011, was born on November 29th, 1959.  Another famous Illinois politician born on November 29th was U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Paul Simon (1928).

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THE START OF SOMETHING BIG

July 4th in history:

The Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4th, 1776. Two leaders of the independence movement, John Adams and Thomas Jefferson, coincidentally died on the 50th anniversary of the Declaration.

Saint Grant RushmoreThomas Jefferson’s face would eventually be carved onto Mount Rushmore in South Dakota, and unveiled in the fall of 1936. George Washington’s face was the first to be unveiled on the mountain, on Independence Day of 1934. That was the 10th birthday of actress Eva Marie Saint, who climbed near the Rushmore faces with Cary Grant in the movie “North by Northwest.” Saint won an Oscar for her role in “On the Waterfront”.

The U.S. military academy at West Point was founded on the 4th of July in 1802.

It was on this date in 1817 that construction of the Erie Canal began.

And on July 4th, 1862, English writer Charles Dodgson first told a story about a girl named Alice, to a girl named Alice (Liddell). Dodgson turned the story into a book, “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” which was published July 4th, 1865, under the pen name “Lewis Carroll.”

HORSE POWER AND CAR POWER

March 16th in history:

The Army Corps of Engineers was established on March 16th, 1802, to operate the military academy at West Point.

On this date in 1916, General John J. Pershing (West Point class of 1886) led the horsemen of the Cavalry across the Mexican border to search for revolutionary Pancho Villa.

Most people gave up horses for cars in the early 20th century. On March 16th, 1958, Ford produced its 50 millionth car, a Thunderbird. Exactly 10 years later on the same date, General Motors made its 100 millionth auto. It was an Olds Toronado.

YOU WOULDN’T LIKE FELIX WHEN HE’S DRUNK

December 26 in history:

A nine-point earthquake under the Indian Ocean triggered a series of tsunamis that battered 14 countries on December 26th, 2004.  More than 280,000 people died, with the largest loss of life coming in Indonesia.  Ocean waves reportedly rose as high as 100 feet.

A theatre fire in Richmond, Virginia, on December 26th, 1811 was considered one of the worst disasters in U.S. history at the time.  Seventy-two of the 600 people attending the Richmond Theatre that night were killed by the fire, including the governor of Virginia.

Two of America’s longest-living presidents died on December 26th, more than 30 years apart.  Both were vice presidents who rose to the presidency on short notice.  Harry Truman was 88 when he died on the day after Christmas of 1972.  93-year-old Gerald Ford died in 2006, just weeks after setting the record for longevity among U.S. presidents.

Future Confederate President Jefferson Davis was among 22 West Point cadets placed under House arrest on this day in 1826 for their alleged roles in the “Eggnog Riot” at the U.S. Military Academy. The uprising resulted from a Christmas party attended by the cadets, where whiskey was smuggled into the academy to make eggnog.

Jack Lemmon and Lee Remick starred as an alcoholic couple in the movie “Days of Wine and Roses,” which opened in the U.S. on December 26th, 1962. Also appearing in the film was Jack Klugman, who later became famous as Oscar Madison in the 1970’s TV version of “The Odd Couple.” Lemmon played Felix Ungar in the 1968 “Odd Couple” movie. “Days of Wine and Roses” opened the same month that Tony Randall (Felix to Klugman’s Oscar) portrayed an alcoholic ad man on a TV episode of “The Alfred Hitchcock Hour.”