Tagged: World’s Fair

UNITED NATIONS

April 27th in history:

The 1967 World’s Fair, the “International and Universal Exposition,” opened in Montreal on this date. It was better known as Expo ’67, marking Canada’s 100th birthday. The fair site remained open as a theme park until 1981.

The British East India Company was granted a monopoly on the tea trade in North America on April 27th, 1773, when the British Parliament passed the Tea Act. That decision led to the original Boston Tea Party later that year.

Born on April 27th: U.S. Grant (1822), Union Army commander in the Civil War and 18th president of the United States, and Cuba Gooding Sr. (1944), lead singer of the ’70s group The Main Ingredient.

FROM START TO FINISH

April 21st in history:

According to legend, the twins Romulus and Remus founded the city of Rome on April 21st in 753 B.C.

The Seattle World’s Fair opened on this date in 1962. April 21st of 1965 was the opening date of the second year of the New York World’s Fair.

Nobody saw Rosie Ruiz at the starting line of the Boston Marathon on April 21st, 1980, but many people saw her cross the finish line, seemingly setting a women’s record. Ruiz was disqualified after witnesses reported that she wasn’t seen running in the 26-mile race until about the last mile.

 

SPORTS IN NEW YORK

April 17th in history:

April 17th was a big day in Mickey Mantle’s baseball career.  Mantle made his major league debut with the New York Yankees on April 17th, 1951, at Yankee Stadium, and even scored a run against the Red Sox.  Two years later, on April 17th, 1953, Mantle swatted a 565-foot home run for the Yankees in a game against the Senators at Washington.

Two reasons why April 17th, 1964, was a notable day in New York: At the World’s Fair, Ford introduced the Mustang; In Flushing Meadows, Shea Stadium opened. It was the home field of the New York Mets for 45 years, and of the New York Jets football team for 20 years.

Norman “Boomer” Esiason was a quarterback for the Jets, the Bengals, and other teams before becoming a sports broadcaster. He was born in the state of New York on this date in 1961.

NEWS OF THE WORLD

October 17 in history:

One of the world’s most famous golf tournaments, the British Open, was played for the first time on October 17th, 1860, at a course in Scotland.  Contestants had to shoot 36 holes of golf in a single day.

Another world-famous championship, the World Series, was disrupted by an earthquake on this date in 1989.  Sixty-three people died in the Loma Prieta earthquake in the San Francisco area.  Most of those deaths occurred because of the collapse of a two-level viaduct on Interstate 880.  As for the World Series, the quake struck 30 minutes before the scheduled start of Game 3 between the San Francisco Giants and Oakland Athletics at Candlestick Park.  The series was postponed for 10 days because of the quake.

A 12-story metal globe of the world, called the Unisphere, symbolized the 1964-65 World’s Fair in Queens, New York, which closed on this date in ’65.  The Unisphere and some other displays at the fair were preserved as local landmarks.

A large globe sits atop the Daily Planet newspaper building in the “Superman” comic books.   Jerry Siegel, one of the creators of the Superman character, was born on this day in 1914…on the planet Earth, not Krypton.  Two people who have played staff members of the Daily Planet in movies or TV shows were born on October 17th.  Margot Kidder (1948) played Lois Lane in the Christopher Reeve “Superman” films, and Michael McKean (1947), also known for “Laverne and Shirley” and “This is Spinal Tap,” appeared as Planet editor Perry White on the “Smallville” TV series.